Kara Smith

Undiscovered Worlds

xeno

n. the smallest measurable unit of human connection, typically exchanged between passing strangers—a flirtatious glance, a sympathetic nod, a shared laugh about some odd coincidence—moments that are fleeting and random but still contain powerful emotional nutrients that can alleviate the symptoms of feeling alone.

(Source: dictionaryofobscuresorrows, via starthandingoutstars)

The one on the right cheats and the other one is nuts. 
#bizarrebazaarphilly
kritseldis:

First day of school, a postcard by artist M.Fuks, 1966.
As far as I know, the school uniform the girl is wearing was used from early 1960-ise until 1967.

kritseldis:

First day of school, a postcard by artist M.Fuks, 1966.

As far as I know, the school uniform the girl is wearing was used from early 1960-ise until 1967.

(via sovietpostcards)

nearinfrared:

edwardhopperuniverse:

Sunday

Edward Hopper - Sunday
elpasha71:

Michael Carson, The Chair,

elpasha71:

Michael Carson, The Chair,

(via nearinfrared)

fleurdulys:

Hotel Room - Edward Hopper
1931

fleurdulys:

Hotel Room - Edward Hopper

1931

(via nearinfrared)

inthemoodtodissolveinthesky:

Egon Schiele, Totes Mädchen, 1910

inthemoodtodissolveinthesky:

Egon Schiele, Totes Mädchen, 1910

(via nearinfrared)

smallrevolutionary:

peaceshine3:

BETTY BOOP - OriginMs. ESTHER JONES, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an ” African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem. Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and (COPIED or stole ). Ms Jones’ ‘baby’ Singing Style! > for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” Ms. Jones’ singing style went on to become the inspiration for (( Max Fleischer )) cartoon character’s Voice and SINGING style of BETTY BOOP, was YES a Black Woman. Her singing trademark Was.. “boop oop a doop “.. In a baby voice at the cotton club in Harlem. - Esther Jones who’s stage name was “Baby Esther” was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret. Helen Kane SAW Baby’s act in 1928 and (stole) Used it in her hit song I Wanna Be Loved By You.An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928. Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.$250,000 infringement lawsuitEsther’s manager also testified that , Helen Kane & her manager , saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.Scholar Robert G.O’ Meally said, Betty Boop The WHITE CARTOON herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her backround.Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.@Learn your History or they will Hide it from you.@BLACK-American MUSIC and DANCE Styles. - Influential WorldWide “

yo.
yooooooooo, that is crazy.

smallrevolutionary:

peaceshine3:

BETTY BOOP - Origin

Ms. ESTHER JONES, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was an ” African-American singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at the (The Cotton Club) in Harlem. 

Singer Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and (COPIED or stole ). Ms Jones’ ‘baby’ Singing Style! > for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” 

Ms. Jones’ singing style went on to become the inspiration for (( Max Fleischer )) cartoon character’s Voice and SINGING style of BETTY BOOP, was YES a Black Woman. 

Her singing trademark Was.. “boop oop a doop “.. In a baby voice at the cotton club in Harlem. - 
Esther Jones who’s stage name was “Baby Esther” was a popular entertainer at Harlem’s Cotton Club in the late 1920s. Baby Esther interpolated words such as ‘Boo-Boo-Boo’ & ‘Doo-Doo-Doo’ in songs at a cabaret. 
Helen Kane SAW Baby’s act in 1928 and (stole) Used it in her hit song I Wanna Be Loved By You.

An early test sound film was also discovered, which featured Baby Esther performing in this style, disproving Kane’s claims. Baby Esther’s manager also testified that Helen Kane had saw Baby Esther’s cabaret act in 1928. 

Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrick ruled: “The plaintiff has failed to sustain either cause of action by proof of sufficient probative force”. In his opinion, the “baby” technique of singing did not originate with Kane.

$250,000 infringement lawsuit

Esther’s manager also testified that , Helen Kane & her manager , saw Baby’s act somewhere between 1928-1929.
Scholar Robert G.O’ Meally said, Betty Boop The WHITE CARTOON herself had, as it were, a BLACK grandmother in her backround.

Baby Esther was presumed dead by 1934, just when the lawsuit had ended.

@Learn your History or they will Hide it from you.
@BLACK-American MUSIC and DANCE Styles. - Influential WorldWide “

yo.

yooooooooo, that is crazy.

(via nearinfrared)

mujeresartistas:

#MujeresArtistas: Georgia O’Keeffe - Evening Star, No. III (1917).
Audio Program excerpt American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe, August 17, 2013–January 26, 2014Curator, Esther Adler: This is one of ten watercolors that O’Keeffe made in a series depicting the evening star. In 1917, she was teaching art at a college in Canyon, Texas and responding to the landscape there through watercolor.Glenn Lowry: In her autobiography, O’Keeffe wrote:Georgia O’Keeffe (read by actor): We often walked away from the town in the late afternoon sun. There were no paved roads and no fences, no trees. It was like the ocean but it was wide, wide land. The evening star would be high in the sunset sky when it was still broad daylight. That evening star fascinated me… . I had nothing but to walk into nowhere and the wide sunset space with the star.Glenn Lowry: O’Keeffe conveys this vast sense of space with just a few brushstrokes.Esther Adler: We get these wide bands of watercolor that are so vibrant and just seem to kind of spread across the paper on their own volition. And I think the movement of the watercolor and the way it washes across the paper here is very reminiscent of what she must have been feeling and seeing when she was walking across this broad landscape.

mujeresartistas:

#MujeresArtistas: Georgia O’Keeffe - Evening Star, No. III (1917).

Audio Program excerpt American Modern: Hopper to O’Keeffe, August 17, 2013–January 26, 2014
Curator, Esther Adler: This is one of ten watercolors that O’Keeffe made in a series depicting the evening star. In 1917, she was teaching art at a college in Canyon, Texas and responding to the landscape there through watercolor.
Glenn Lowry: In her autobiography, O’Keeffe wrote:
Georgia O’Keeffe (read by actor): We often walked away from the town in the late afternoon sun. There were no paved roads and no fences, no trees. It was like the ocean but it was wide, wide land. The evening star would be high in the sunset sky when it was still broad daylight. That evening star fascinated me… . I had nothing but to walk into nowhere and the wide sunset space with the star.
Glenn Lowry: O’Keeffe conveys this vast sense of space with just a few brushstrokes.
Esther Adler: We get these wide bands of watercolor that are so vibrant and just seem to kind of spread across the paper on their own volition. And I think the movement of the watercolor and the way it washes across the paper here is very reminiscent of what she must have been feeling and seeing when she was walking across this broad landscape.

(via itsfigshoney)

nycartscene:

Opens Sept 10:“A New Surrealism, Works from the 1930’s” Joseph CornellVan Doren Waxter Gallery, 23 East 73rd St., NYCThe exhibition features small-scale collages of the 1930’s, Joseph Cornell’s first forays into the found object assemblages for which he became known. Other exhibition highlights include box compositions, whimsical pocket-sized pill box creations from Cornell’s initial experimentation with objects and containers that lead to the shadow box. These works give an intimate look into the imaginative vision of this uniquely self-taught American surrealist. Cornell’s idiosyncratic method developed as he visited art galleries and second-hand book sellers in Manhattan’s mercantile district, where he acquired a collection of materials and ephemera. His early collections of memorabilia and curiosities were integral to his creative process. The cultivated and curated collections, which Cornell would use to compose his assemblages, drew from his eclectic interests that ranged from literature, music and dance, maps and science, to a fascination with Hollywood and Vaudeville and to the spiritual theories of Christian Science, which the artist first embraced in the 1920’s. Cornell is widely characterized as reclusive, as he seldom ventured far from the Utopia Parkway, Queens, New York home he shared with his mother and disabled brother. - thru Oct 31

nycartscene:

Opens Sept 10:

A New Surrealism, Works from the 1930’s
 Joseph Cornell

Van Doren Waxter Gallery, 23 East 73rd St., NYC

The exhibition features small-scale collages of the 1930’s, Joseph Cornell’s first forays into the found object assemblages for which he became known. Other exhibition highlights include box compositions, whimsical pocket-sized pill box creations from Cornell’s initial experimentation with objects and containers that lead to the shadow box. These works give an intimate look into the imaginative vision of this uniquely self-taught American surrealist. Cornell’s idiosyncratic method developed as he visited art galleries and second-hand book sellers in Manhattan’s mercantile district, where he acquired a collection of materials and ephemera. His early collections of memorabilia and curiosities were integral to his creative process. The cultivated and curated collections, which Cornell would use to compose his assemblages, drew from his eclectic interests that ranged from literature, music and dance, maps and science, to a fascination with Hollywood and Vaudeville and to the spiritual theories of Christian Science, which the artist first embraced in the 1920’s. Cornell is widely characterized as reclusive, as he seldom ventured far from the Utopia Parkway, Queens, New York home he shared with his mother and disabled brother. - thru Oct 31