Kara Smith

Undiscovered Worlds

tassels:

Bialystok, Poland

tassels:

Bialystok, Poland

kritseldis:

A decorative postcard by artist Aili Vint, 1974

kritseldis:

A decorative postcard by artist Aili Vint, 1974

(via sovietpostcards)

ageoftheart:

Mother with Two Children
Artist: Egon SchieleYear: 1917Type: Oil on canvas

ageoftheart:

Mother with Two Children

Artist: Egon Schiele
Year: 1917
Type: Oil on canvas

(via thegiftsoflife)

design-is-fine:

Medium Pigment Bottle Royal Blue of the artist Chiura Obata, 20th century. USA. Via FAMSF

design-is-fine:

Medium Pigment Bottle Royal Blue of the artist Chiura Obata, 20th century. USA. Via FAMSF

(via thegiftsoflife)

exhibition-ism:

Louise Bourgeois: Works on Paper currently at the Tate Modern through 15 April 2015 

(via itsfigshoney)

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Enemy Alien Registration Affidavit for Albert Pagenkopf, 1917 - 1921.

Item From: Records of U.S. Attorneys. (07/01/1870)

Albert Pagenkopf filled out this enemy alien registration form stating that he had lived in the United States since 1883 and resided in Kansas. Pagenkopf was compelled to register as an enemy alien because Germany was his country of origin. During World War I, the U.S. government required German immigrants to fill out these forms due to fears of espionage and sabotage.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DEJm

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut

In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”
I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”
I said, “Saul, are you gifted?”
Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut

In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”

I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”

I said, “Saul, are you gifted?

Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

(via inklines)

burnedshoes:

Unknown photographer, ca. 1929, Portrait of Hermann Hesse
"Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness."
― Hermann Hesse, Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte 
» more photos of Hermann Hesse «  |  » more photos of famous people «

burnedshoes:

Unknown photographer, ca. 1929, Portrait of Hermann Hesse

"Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours. They are wiser than we are, as long as we do not listen to them. But when we have learned how to listen to trees, then the brevity and the quickness and the childlike hastiness of our thoughts achieve an incomparable joy. Whoever has learned how to listen to trees no longer wants to be a tree. He wants to be nothing except what he is. That is home. That is happiness."

― Hermann Hesse, Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte

» more photos of Hermann Hesse «  |  » more photos of famous people «

(via itsfigshoney)

Fisher Bridge